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Middle East African Journal of Ophthalmology Middle East African Journal of Ophthalmology
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2009  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 29-34

Low vision Aids provision for visually impaired Egyptian patients - a clinical outcome


1 Department of Ophthalmology, Mansoura Ophthalmic Center, Mansoura University, El-Mansoura city, 35516, Egypt; Department of Ophthalmology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama City, Japan
2 Department of Ophthalmology, Mansoura Ophthalmic Center, Mansoura University, El-Mansoura city, 35516, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Sherin Shaaban
Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama City, 700-8558, Japan

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-9233.48865

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Purpose: To evaluate a low vision rehabilitation service implemented for heterogeneously diverse group of Egyptianpatients with vision loss in terms of improving their visual performance and fulfilling their visual needs. Methods: Fifty patients with low vision were included in a prospective study. History taking, ophthalmic examinationand evaluation of the visual functions were performed for all patients. The required magnification was calculated, andsubsequently a low vision aid was chosen after counseling with patients. Low vision aids were tried in office, followedby a period of training before patients received their own low vision aids. Follow up was done for 6 months. Results: All patients who were referred to the low vision unit were not satisfied with their current spectacles or lowvision aids. After training and prescription of suitable LVAs, the improvement in distance and near visual acuity wasstatistically significant (p<0.001). Fifty-six per cent of the patients (n=28) showed improvement in distance visualacuity of 5 lines or more, and 57% of the patients (n=27) could discern N8 print size or better. The most commonlyused aids were high powered near adds. Despite the complaints about the appearance and use of LVAs, 76% of thepatients reported being moderately to highly-satisfied with their aids. Conclusions: The significant improvement in the visual performance of patients with low vision after the prescriptionand training on the use of LVAs, associated with patients' satisfaction, confirms the importance of expanding lowvision rehabilitative services and increasing the public awareness of its existence and benefits.


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