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Middle East African Journal of Ophthalmology Middle East African Journal of Ophthalmology
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SYMPOSIUM - UVEITIS UPDATE
Year : 2009  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 245-251

Inflammatory choroidal neovascularization


1 The Eye Clinic-Ospedali Riuniti Umberto I-G.M. Lancisi-G. Salesi-Ancona, Italy
2 The Eye Clinic-Ospedali Riuniti Umberto I-G.M. Lancisi-G. Salesi-Ancona; Polytechnic University of Marche, Ancona, Italy

Correspondence Address:
Piergiorgio Neri
Via Conca 71, 60020 Torrette-Ancona
Italy
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-9233.58422

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Purpose and Methods: Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) can be a severe sight-threatening sequela, which can be secondary to both infectious and noninfectious uveitis. This review summarizes the different diseases associated with CNV, highlighting new treatment modalities and the possible strategies, which could be applied for the therapy of this occurrence. Results: Since CNV can often originate from posterior pole lesions and can be hard to identify, an accurate examination is mandatory in order to identify the correct diagnosis. In the majority of cases, fluorescein angiography (FA), indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) enable the determination of the clinical characteristics of the CNV. An infectious disease should be looked for to include a suitable therapy when available. The treatment strategy for CNV secondary to noninfectious uveal inflammations should be directed at controlling the inflammatory process. Systemic corticosteroids with or without immunosuppressive agents are indicated even when the CNV occurs with apparently inactive uveitis: Chronic subclinical inflammation can be the basis for the pathogenesis of CNV. Additional therapies aimed directly at the neovascular process, such as the intravitreal anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) agents, are recommended particularly when the therapy shows an insufficient response. Conclusion: CNV secondary to uveitis is a severe sequela leading to significant visual impairment. ICGA is mandatory in order to obtain relevant information about the choroidal status. Several therapeutic options have been considered, but no guidelines are provided at the moment. Moreover, the current data are still only based on case reports or small series. For such reasons, further trials are mandatory to validate the preliminary available results.


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