About MEAJO | Editorial board | Search | Ahead of print | Current Issue | Archives | Instructions to authors | Online submission | Subscribe | Advertise | Contact | Login 
Middle East African Journal of Ophthalmology Middle East African Journal of Ophthalmology
Users Online: 476   Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2010  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 330-334

Tracing children with blindness and visual impairment using the key informant survey in a district of north-western Nigeria


1 Ophthalmology Department, Sir Yahaya Memorial Hospital, Birnin Kebbi, Nigeria
2 Ophthalmology Department, Specialist Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria
3 Sokoto State Eye Care Programme, Sokoto, Nigeria
4 National Eye Centre, Kaduna, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Nasiru Muhammad
Sir Yahaya Memorial Hospital, Birnin Kebbi, Kebbi State
Nigeria
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: Sight Savers International, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-9233.71601

Rights and Permissions

Purpose: To identify children with irreversible blindness in a district of northern Nigeria for enrolment into an inclusive education pilot project. Materials and Methods: Using key informants (KIs) working and residing within the communities, children with blindness and visual impairment in Gwadabawa local government area (LGA) were identified and then examined by a team of ophthalmologists/optometrists. Data analysis was performed manually using simple percentages and proportions. Results: Sixty children were reported with visual problems by parents/guardians of whom 58 (97%) were examined. Twenty children (35%) were blind, 17 (29%) were irreversibly blind, and 9 (16%) had low vision (<6/18 to 3/60) with presenting vision. The major causes of childhood blindness were corneal opacity/phthisis bulbi (75%), and cataract (15%). The cause of irreversible blindness in these children was largely preventable (80%) as it was due to childhood-related illnesses, such as vitamin A deficiency and measles. Conclusions: The major causes of childhood blindness in the study area were avoidable and the use of KI survey in this study provided an opportunity for service delivery.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed3136    
    Printed145    
    Emailed1    
    PDF Downloaded156    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 7    

Recommend this journal