Middle East African Journal of Ophthalmology

OCULAR ONCOLOGY UPDATE
Year
: 2018  |  Volume : 25  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 60--64

Orbital metastases: When to suspect? When to biopsy?


Richard Cutler Allen 
 Department of Ophthalmology, Cullen Eye Institute, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77005, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Richard Cutler Allen
Department of Ophthalmology, Cullen Eye Institute, Baylor College of Medicine, 1977 Butler Blvd., BCM633, Houston, TX 77030
USA

Incidental orbital masses that are asymptomatic and appear benign are often observed without surgical intervention unless there is a clinical or radiographic change in the mass. There is a burgeoning population of cancer patients with incidental masses that have been detected while under surveillance for metastasis. This population of patients is growing due to a number of reasons, including more extensive imaging, an aging population, and more effective cancer treatments. Closer scrutiny should be applied to these patients, due to the possibility of the mass being an orbital metastasis. In addition, the approach to these patients may have implications regarding the adult patient without a cancer history who presents with a symptomatic orbital mass. The purpose of this paper is to explore the approach to the patient with and without a cancer history who presents with an orbital mass.


How to cite this article:
Allen RC. Orbital metastases: When to suspect? When to biopsy?.Middle East Afr J Ophthalmol 2018;25:60-64


How to cite this URL:
Allen RC. Orbital metastases: When to suspect? When to biopsy?. Middle East Afr J Ophthalmol [serial online] 2018 [cited 2021 Dec 6 ];25:60-64
Available from: http://www.meajo.org/article.asp?issn=0974-9233;year=2018;volume=25;issue=2;spage=60;epage=64;aulast=Allen;type=0